Friday, September 17, 2021

Obama criticizes Trump for “demeaning women”

El presidente estadounidene, Barack Obama, se dirige a los medios sobre el huracán Matthew en el Despacho Oval de la Casa Blanca en Washington, Estados Unidos, hoy 7 de octubre de 2016. El huracán Matthew llega a Florida, desde donde enfilará hacia el norte siguiendo la costa este de EEUU, después de haber sembrado la destrucción por varios países del Caribe. EFE/Michael Reynolds

El presidente estadounidene, Barack Obama, se dirige a los medios sobre el huracán Matthew en el Despacho Oval de la Casa Blanca en Washington, Estados Unidos, hoy 7 de octubre de 2016. El huracán Matthew llega a Florida, desde donde enfilará hacia el norte siguiendo la costa este de EEUU, después de haber sembrado la destrucción por varios países del Caribe. EFE/Michael Reynolds

Washington, Oct 9 (EFE).- U.S. President Barack Obama on Sunday criticized Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump for “demeaning women,” amid the scandal that erupted late last week with the release of a videotape on which the mogul can be heard making lewd and sexist comments about women.

“It tells you that he’s insecure enough that he pumps himself up by putting other people down,” said Obama at a Democratic Party fundraiser in Chicago. “It tells you he doesn’t care much for the basic values of civility or respect.”
The president said Trump’s “unbelievable rhetoric” has been “disturbing.”

This was the first time Obama had commented publicly about the mogul’s recently revealed comments, which came to light on Friday with the release of a 2005 videotape in which Trump can be heard making obscene and vulgar remarks about women.

Obama said that Trump had made other derogatory remarks about other groups during the campaign, “Demeaning women, degrading women, but also minorities, immigrants, people of other faiths, mocking the disabled.”

Top leaders of the Republican Party have roundly condemned the offensive words used by the New York businessman at the same time that many conservative lawmakers and key GOP figures have called for Trump to withdraw from the race and/or have withdrawn their support for him.

On Saturday, the mogul made clear that he has no intention of backing out of the race, telling The Washington Post, “I’d never withdraw. I’ve never withdrawn in my life,” and The Wall Street Journal that there is “zero chance I’ll quit.”

He also released a taped apology, although that apparently has done little – so far at least – to quell the public outcry over his remarks.

A survey published on Sunday, seems to confirm Trump’s apparent decision to remain in the race, given that the vast majority of his supporters say they continue to support him and are not listening to the GOP leadership’s calls for him to throw in the towel.

The scandal, and its accompanying firestorm of criticism for the mogul, comes as he is preparing to face off with Democratic rival Hillary Clinton in the second presidential debate Sunday evening, broadcast from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.

Clinton has remained silent on the matter since Friday, when she said in a Twitter post: “This is horrific. We cannot allow this man to become president.”